Bite of Brainfood Blog

A Whole New (Garden) World

 

Look at our garden, isn’t it neat?  Wouldn’t you think our collection’s complete?

We’ve got garlic and kale a-plenty… 

We’ve got radish and pumpkins galore… 

You want pole beans? We’ve got twenty…

 

 

 

 

 

But who cares? No big deal. We want more….

  

 

                  

Stepping into Food Entrepreneurship: Brainfood Homegrown at Union Market

What D.C. activities did you get into over the weekend? Have a picnic at the tidal basin? Stroll through the drum circle at Malcolm X Park? Visit a museum on the national mall? While you were enjoying the gorgeous spring weather and all the unique outings D.C. has to offer on Saturday and Sunday, you may not have even realized that Brainfood was up to some exciting D.C. adventures of our own. On Saturday May 2nd, Brainfood Homegrown opened its very own market stand in the ever-tantalizing and delicious Union Market in Northeast D.C.

Wontons, Pickles, and More: Guest Chefs in the Kitchen!

Kitchen All Stars participants have been hard at work all year advancing their cooking prowess, building healthy group dynamics with their classmates, and developing leadership skills. As we approach the final weeks of afterschool programming, it’s the perfect time to bring in culinary professionals who graciously offer their time and skills to further our teens’ exposure to new foods and cooking techniques.

Last week, participants at our Columbia Heights site hosted two engaging Guest Chefs. We are thankful for Chefs Ztang Ruangsangwatana of DC Noodles and Yi Wah and Caitlin Roberts of Number 1 Sons for their fun and informative workshops!

Share in our fun, and check out these great action shots from last week’s classes! Stay tuned for more updates from additional guest chef visits on our blog and social media in the coming weeks...

Chef Ztang demonstrating knife skills

 

Connecting to our Roots...Through Dessert!

Last week , we teamed up with our fabulous, generous friends at Poste Moderne Brasserie  for a unique new fundraiser event: the Sugar Showdown. The event featured some of DC’s top pastry talent getting together for a friendly competition and guests enjoying an evening of sweets and bubbly on the patio, all to benefit Brainfood.  These amazing chefs whipped up imaginative, seasonal desserts for judges and guests to sample, and we all got to cast our votes for the winner. Guests enjoyed champagne and small savory bites by Poste chef Kyoo Eom, along with the phenomenal treats featured in the competition, and a wonderful time was had by all.

Of course, these chefs couldn’t make just anything! We all know a cooking competition is no fun without a limiting parameter or challenge of some kind.  The theme for the Sugar Showdown was both literal and conceptual in nature, and it’s a concept that I found extremely compelling: roots. The chefs interpreted this to mean culinary roots, family roots, community roots and actual roots -- as in, root vegetables. So what’s a dessert chef to do with the theme of roots? Well, these contestants had some pretty creative solutions:

Poste Moderne's Casto Unson, served a purple yam éclair with candied kumquat and rosemary oolong tuile, which he explained that his dish was inspired by his Filipino heritage and the flavors profiles of the cuisine he grew up with. Trummer's On Main's Deborah Brown served a carrot pecan cake with a citrus glaze and a cream cheese parfait (plus a salted beet chip as a garnish!) and her display table included an old heirloom cookbook, yellowed and frayed, opened to the page of the cake she featured.  Chef Caitlin Dysart of the restaurant 2941 served a ginger root budino on a carrot walnut cake with carrot confit, which was the crowd favorite, winning the “people’s choice” award of the evening. Meredith Tomason of Rare Sweets spoke about the Italian side of her family using pistachio in many desserts, which she featured as a garnish on her chilled rhubarb soup with vanilla bean and licorice root semifreddo, the dish that won the “judges choice” award in the competition.
 

Jet-Setting Around the World

Jet-setting around the world is a dream many of us have. And thanks to food, we have the opportunity to experience brand new cultures and countries right from our very own homes.  Here at Brainfood, we are ‘traveling’ to different countries and the ride is about to get wild.

Our first stop: Jamaica. Well known for its vibrant colors and spiciness, Jamaican food has a unique mixture of tastes from the rich native history and colonizing countries. The coconut crop from the Spanish, porridge and sweets from the British, and curry from the Indians showcase the influences from many different cultures worldwide. And at the root of the cuisine, is the strong history of the Maroons (Jamaican slaves who were able to escape into the mountains during British power) and their survival.
 

Maroons created the Jerk as a way to preserve and cook their meat and fish. Jamaican Jerk consists of two main ingredients: allspice (pimento) and scotch bonnet peppers. 

Signs of Spring from the Brainfood Youth Garden

 

Our kale’s first visit to the garden! After spending their entire 23 days of life indoors under grow lights, they need some time to adjust to the variability of living outside in the garden. They spent their first hour outside swaying in the breeze and soaking up their first rays of real sunshine. Thank you to our Kitchen All-Stars for starting our first spring plants!

 


 

The garlic that has been cozily nestled in a bed blanketed by straw and row cover finally stretches towards the springtime sun. Look forward to some garlic scape pesto!

 

But It's a Tradition!

I started thinking about the importance of food traditions one night  after one of my favorite Brainfood classes, led by Community MVPs weekly classroom assistant, Ceci and her mom, Fina (her dad also made a guest appearance just in time to taste the food). Ceni and Fina, who are both Cuban, taught MVPs how to make delicious Arroz con Pollo, Tostones with a garlic sauce, and Natilla. When it came time to eat, with each bite of a new dish Ceci would say, “This reminds me of my childhood so much!” Even Fina had to admit that the Arroz con Pollo made by MVPs was better than any version she has made- quite a testimony to how awesome our MVPs are.  Class ended with students interviewing each other about their family’s food traditions, which got me thinking about my family’s food traditions.   
    

Food Day Post: Youth Voices from Brainfood!

This week on the Bite of Brainfood Blog, we thought we’d feature the blog post that Brainfood recently contributed to the Food Day Blog. For those of you who may not be familiar with it, Food Day is a national event that uses the phrases “real food, just food” to describe its focus. Food Day seeks to “inspire Americans to change their diets and our food policies.” Food Day is a project of the Center for Science and the Public Interest, and has dozens of national partner organizations. The Food Day Blog is a wonderful collection of stories, recipes, articles, and other glimpses into inspiring work happening all over the nation that is transforming the food system. When Brainfood was contacted about publishing a post on the Food Day blog, we were honored to be a part of such an important project! And our first thought, of course, was to put our student voices front and center. We were thrilled to be able to use this opportunity to amplify youth voices and give our participants a national audience for their writing about Brainfood.

Did I ever tell you about the time...?

You know the scene that usually plays out when you go home for Thanksgiving? The one where your older relatives start getting nostalgic and telling stories about the past? If your family is like mine, it looks like this: Great Aunt Thelma settles into the cushy arm chair after dinner with a cup of hot chamomile in one hand and a crossword puzzle in the other, adjusts her glasses, and says, “Did I ever tell you about the time…?”

 

In my family, she would begin with the classics, like the one where uncle Mike, when he was 16, snuck away in Grandpa’s Lincoln Continental and drove doughnuts and figure eights through the neighbor’s front yard. Then she might jump ahead 15 years or so and pull out a picture of me when I was four years old, dressed up as an 80’s rocker, chomping on bubble gum, and banging kitchen pots and pans with wooden spoons.

How to Find Sunshine in the Winter

First, picture this: a D.C. high school at 9:00 AM.  It’s 30 degrees and windy walking through the parking lot, and the ramps and stairs that lead to main entrance are crusted in snow, thanks to the late February freeze.   But despite the weather and the early morning, despite the fact that it’s a Saturday, the folks streaming into the atrium at Wilson Senior High School look more like a group that’s heading to a sunny recess break than a group braving the cold to get to Saturday school.

And that’s because, in a lot of ways, the experience that awaits inside has more similarities to a sunny recess break than an interminable winter class day.

Syndicate content